Category Archives: News

The National Health Service

It is at our beginning, and at our end.

It delivers us from suffering and pain.

Reassure us when we’re frail and frightened,

We trust it to make us well again.

 

Staff work long hours for low wages.

Because they are people who care.

They know the importance of kindness,

Of knowledge; experience, of just being there.

 

The N. H. S. is underfunded,

But it mustn’t give up the fight.

It’s the jewel in the crown of our kingdom,

The thing that is just, and good, and right.

 

It’s always there when we need it,

Prioritizing each individual’s health.

We must not allow this service to falter,

Or be stolen by political stealth.

 

So thank you to the nurses,

The doctors, the staff and volunteers

Who make our world a better place

May your legacy continue for many more years.

REVIEW: “i will still be whole “(when you rip me in half)

Tiptoe down the concrete slipway off Southwork Street; loiter outside the forbidding wooden frontage. Knock knock, the doors open… and you step into party time! The Bunker Theatre is bright, its loud, its packed and its friendly.

This Theatre (previously an underground car park) opened almost three and a half years ago, and its ethic “To give ambitious artists a home in which to share their work with adventurous audiences” is exemplary. It’s so sad, therefore, to hear that it will be closing in March 2020 when its lease runs out.

Ava Wong’s debut play “i will still be whole (when you rip me in half)” explores the relationship between daughter EJ (Aoife Hinds) and her mother Joy (Tuyen Do) who abandoned her 22 years previously. It plays out as a series of intertwining monologues that reveal the choices both women have made. EJ; Anxious and uncertain about her sexual attraction to women. Joy; who loves running and erasing all traces of her Chinese identity.

The potential of the writing is crystal clear; the dialogue between the two characters is authentic and moving, poetic in places, and effective in revealing their very different characters.

Visually the production was rather lacking in drama, the staging was dull and rather inert. I found myself closing my eyes and just listening as the play moved towards the meeting between mother and daughter.

Perhaps staging it as a radio play might fulfill its potential?

The programming of The Bunkers final few months, will focus on collaborations with Women and LGBTQ Artists.

I recommend a visit whilst you still can!

Bunker Theatre SE1 // 0207 234048 // 13-23rdNov

Poem for NCHAW

In this week across our nation

We stand united in this call.

“There is no place for hatred.”

Because hatred, hurts us all.

 

Whatever your sexuality or religion

Ability, gender, colour of skin

This battle against hate crime

It’s one we have to win.

 

Let’s educate the ignorant.

Dispel prejudice and fear.

Promote that Love is a human right,

Be open and be clear.

 

We can make a difference,

By what we do and say,

Against the intolerance and injustice,

Some people suffer every day

 

It’s okay to be different,

Lets honour who we are.

Make our world a safer place,

For all of us, near and far.

Review: “Wife”

 

Induhu Rubasingham’s world premiere of of “Wife” by Samuel Adamson, at the revamped and re-named Kiln theatre in Kilburn, positively fizzes with camp and intellectual exuberance.

Based on Ibsen’s character of Nora (from “A Doll’s House”), a woman  stifled within the constrained and subordinate role of wife, this slick, muscular production, skillfully examines, through four contrasting (but generationally linked) scenes, society’s changing perspective on marriage, gender and queerness.

The first scene, set in 1959, in the dressing room of a production of “A Doll’s House”, shows middle class, married Daisy desperately trying to salvage her (secret) relationship with lover Suzannah.

The second scene, set in the 80’s, reveals the juxtaposition of sexual politics and personal power at play within in the relationship of gallery owner Robert and his mothers’ (Daisy) carer, Eric.

Each scene plays out the same theme: the role of a wife. It’s characters (straight and gay) wrestling to maintain a balance of personal freedom, compromise and equality within their relationships.

There’s a lot of crash, bang and wallop in this show – and not just on the entertaining front. It’s a challenging and thought-provoking production brimming with pathos, politics and laugh out loud moments.

Despite minor flaws – occasional clumsy directional shifts from one scene to another, and some of the characters coming across as rather stereotypical – I loved this production.

This was an ensemble piece, with the actors playing a number of parts. Special mention to Karen Fishwick, playing Daisy perfectly on point, and Calam Lynch, playing Eric with an understated talent that shone.

This production runs at the Kiln Theatre, Kilburn (0207 328 1000) until the 6thJuly. I recommend you go and see it…take your wife (who ever she, or he may be)